Engaging Communities in Refugee Protection: The Potential of Private Sponsorship in Europe

Across Europe, grassroots efforts have emerged in the wake of crisis that draw members of the public into the process of receiving refugees and supporting their integration. This policy brief examines the many forms community-based or private sponsorship can take,
what benefits such approaches may hold for European communities, and the tradeoffs policymakers face in their implementation.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/PrivateSponsorshipEurope-Fratzke_FINALWEB.pdf

Following the Money: Lack of Transparency in Donor Funding for Syrian Refugee Education

This report tracks donors’ fulfillment of their pledges to support education for Syrian refugees in 2016. It focuses on pledges made at a major conference in February 2016 in London, where donors—the six largest were the European Union, US, Germany, United Kingdom, Norway, and Japan—committed to provide $1.4 billion in funding for education inside Syria and in neighboring countries, and agreed with refugee-hosting countries to enroll all Syrian refugee children, as well as vulnerable children in host communities, in “quality education” by the end of the 2016-2017 school year.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/crdsyrianrefugees0917_web_2.pdf

Chad: between recession and repression: the rising cost of dissent in Chad

When President Idriss Déby took power in Chad in 1990, he promised to make a decisive break from the horrors of the previous eight years. Over a quarter of a century later, the conviction of former President Hissène Habré in 2016 for crimes against humanity, war crimes and torture may have gone some way to begin healing past wounds. However, full guarantees of individual and collective freedoms for all Chadians remain elusive and an apparatus of repression remains in place muzzling the voices of those who stand
up and speak out to criticize the government or its policies.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AFR2070452017ARABIC.PDF
https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AFR2070452017ENGLISH.PDF
https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AFR2070452017FRENCH.PDF

Peru: a toxic state: violations of the right to health of indigenous peoples in Cuninico and Espinar, Peru

A Toxic State reveals how the Peruvian government has failed to provide adequate healthcare for Indigenous communities in Cuninico and Espinar, in the country’s Amazonian and Andean regions, respectively. Studies found that their only sources of fresh water were contaminated with toxic metals harmful to human health.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AMR4670482017SPANISH.PDF
https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AMR4670482017ENGLISH.PDF

UNHCR report highlights education crisis for refugee children

More than 3.5 million refugee children aged 5 to 17 did not have the chance to attend school in the last academic year, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, says in a report released today. These include some 1.5 million refugee children missing out on primary school, the report found, while 2 million refugee adolescents are not in secondary school. The report compares UNHCR sources and statistics on refugee education with data from UNESCO, the United Nations educational, scientific and cultural organization, on school enrolment around the world. Globally, 91 per cent of children attend primary school. For
refugees, that figure is far lower at only 61 per cent – and in low-income countries it is less than 50 per cent.

http://www.unhcr.org/59b696f44.pdf

Bosnia and Herzegovina: “we need support, not pity”: last chance for justice for Bosnia’s wartime rape survivors

Two decades after the end of the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, many of the estimated 20,000 women who had been subjected to rape and other forms of sexual violence are still battling with the pervasive and devastating consequences of these crimes. This report paints a bleak picture of the conditions in which many survivors live today and shows how a combination of factors has resulted in the failure of the authorities to provide the victims with meaningful justice and reparation for the crimes they suffered.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/EUR6366792017BOSNIAN.PDF
https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/EUR6366792017ENGLISH.PDF

CPT publishes new report on Italy

In a report published today on its periodic visit to Italy (8-21 April 2016), the Council of Europe’s Committee for the Prevention of Torture and Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment (CPT) raises its concerns over allegations of physical ill-treatment of persons deprived of their liberty by law enforcement agencies or in prisons. Moreover, persons in police custody do not always benefit from the safeguards afforded them by law.

https://rm.coe.int/pdf/16807412c2

https://rm.coe.int/pdf/16807412c3  (resumen ejecutivo)

https://rm.coe.int/pdf/16807412c4  (respuesta)

 

Tracing the Channels Refugees Use to Seek Protection in Europe.

Following the 2015­–16 crisis that saw record numbers of refugees arrive in Europe, policymakers have shown interest in creating managed, legal alternatives to the dangerous, unauthorized journeys many asylum seekers make. While these discussions should be informed by an understanding of current pathways and protection channels, it is “nearly impossible” to know how protection seekers enter and what legal channels are available to them, as this MPI Europe report explains.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/MPI-EPIM_ChannelsOfEntry_FINALWEB.pdf

 

Quality for Whom? Supporting Diverse Children and Workers in Early Childhood Quality Rating and Improvement Systems

For children in U.S. homes where a language other than English is spoken, early childhood programs that are responsive to their needs can be key to later academic success. But as states refine their Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS) to assess such programs, immigrant early childhood workers with in-demand language and cultural skills may be left behind. This report examines the challenges these workers face and promising practices to serve diverse communities.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/StateQRIS-Diversity_FINAL_WEB.pdf

 

Bahrain: ‘No one can protect you’: Bahrain’s year of crushing dissent

Index number: MDE 11/6790/2017. Since June 2016, Bahrain has rapidly deteriorated into a full-blown human rights crisis. The authorities have dramatically stepped up their clampdown on freedom of expression. They have subjected over 160 peaceful critics to arrest, prosecution and imprisonment, as well as other forms of harassments. Those particularly targeted have been human rights defenders and political activists, as well as lawyers, journalists and Shi’a clerics. Credible reports indicate that security forces have subjected several of them to torture or other ill-treatment in custody. The authorities have also targeted Bahraini activists residing outside Bahrain, subjecting their families to interrogation and prosecution in reprisal for their relatives’ human rights activities or participation in protests abroad.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/MDE1167902017ENGLISH.PDF