Author: boletinderechoshumanos

Current migration situation in the EU: Community policing

This report outlines examples of community policing measures in select EU Member State regions and localities with recently arrived asylum seekers and migrants. It focuses on four main issues: 1) community policing, 2) related police training, 3) community involvement (for example: consultations; giving voice to the concerns of local communities; police involvement in local responses to concerns), and 4) crime prevention activities.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-june-2017-monthly-migration-report-focus-community-policing_en.pdf

 

European legal and policy framework on immigration detention of children

Up to one third of migrants arriving in the European Union since the summer of 2015 have been children. The current emphasis on speedier asylum processing and making returns more effective may trigger increased use of immigration detention, possibly also affecting children. The detention of children implicates various fundamental rights and will only be in line with EU law if limited to exceptional cases. This report aims to support practitioners in implementing relevant polices in line with applicable law by outlining available safeguards against unlawful and arbitrary detention and highlighting promising practices.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2017-immigration-detention-children_en.pdf

 

Weathering Crisis, Forging Ahead: Swedish Asylum and Integration Policy

The Swedish asylum system—long one of the most efficient and generous in the world—faced an unprecedented challenge in the fall of 2015. As the number of refugees and migrants arriving in Sweden surged, processing times for asylum applications grew and emergency housing reached capacity. Schools struggled to enroll young newcomers, who made up nearly half of asylum applicants in 2015. The pace of arrivals, coupled with existing housing, teacher, and interpreter shortages, brought this robust system to a crisis point.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/TCM-Asylum-Sweden-FINAL.pdf

 

Mecanismo Nacional de Prevención de la Tortura. Informe anual 2016

El informe expone la actividad desarrollada por el Mecanismo Nacional de Prevención de la Tortura y otros tratos o penas crueles, inhumanos o degradantes (MNP) durante el año 2016.

https://www.defensordelpueblo.es/informe-mnp/mecanismo-nacional-prevencion-la-tortura-informe-anual-2016/

 

Time to Repeal U.S. Sanctions on Sudan?

The clock is ticking for President Trump who must decide by 12 July whether to lift decades-long U.S. sanctions on Sudan. The failure of economic penalties to alter Khartoum’s behaviour so far means Washington should repeal some sanctions and continue a process of conditional engagement.

https://d2071andvip0wj.cloudfront.net/b127-time-to-repeal-us-sanctions.pdf

 

Breaking the Impasse: Reducing Protracted Internal Displacement as a Collective Outcome

(Report from UNOCHA). The global number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) has reached an all-time high, as an increasing number of IDPs remain displaced for years or even decades. In 2014, more than 50 countries were reported to have people living in internal displacement for more than 10 years. As illustrated in the five country case studies informing this report (Colombia, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the Philippines, Somalia and Ukraine)i , a rapidly resolved internal displacement crisis where IDPs find durable solutions—sustainable return, local integration or relocation—has become a rare exception.

http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/Breaking-the-impasse.pdf

 

South Sudan – “It was as if my village was swept by a flood” – Mass displacement of the Shilluk population from the West Bank of the White Nile

Index number: AFR 65/6538/2017. Tens of thousands of civilians in South Sudan’s Upper Nile region were forcibly displaced in January to May 2017, as government forces burnt, shelled and looted their homes. Aided by Dinka militias, government forces undertook a ground offensive in the Upper Nile region in early/mid 2017, retaking territory that had been under the control of armed opposition forces. They attacked numerous towns and villages on the west bank of the White Nile, an area belonging to the traditional kingdom of the Shilluk ethnic minority. In addition to massive forced displacement, government forces and allied militia were responsible for deliberate killings, indiscriminate attacks, and systematic looting.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/AFR6565382017ENGLISH.PDF

 

“Just Let Us Be”. Discrimination Against LGBT Students in the Philippines

This report documents the range of abuses against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students in secondary school. It details widespread bullying and harassment, discriminatory policies and practices, and an absence of supportive resources that undermine the right to education under international law and put LGBT youth at risk.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/philippineslgbt0617_web.pdf