Unión Europea

After the Storm: Learning from the EU Response to the Migration Crisis.

Much has changed since 2015, when irregular migration flows across the Mediterranean spiked, leaving EU and national policymakers scrambling to expand reception and registration capacity, coordinate aid and services, and manage onward movements across Europe. A great deal of learning and progress has taken place in areas such as information collection and sharing, coordination, leadership, and resourcing. Yet officials remain concerned that, should a new migration crisis arise, the European Union may still struggle to respond.

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/EUCrisisResponse_FINALWEB.pdf

 

Hate crime recording and data collection practice across the EU

Across the European Union, people face hatred because of their skin colour, ethnicity, religion, gender or sexuality. In response, the EU and its Member States have introduced laws against hate crime and support services for victims. But these will only fulfil their potential if victims report hate-motivated harassment and violence to the police, and if police officers record such incidents as hate crimes. This report provides rich and detailed information on hate crime recording and data collection systems across the EU, including any systemic cooperation with civil society.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-hate-crime-recording_en.pdf

 

ECRE Comments on the reform of the Migration Statistics Regulation

ECRE has published its Comments on the European Commission proposal for an amendment to the Migration Statistics Regulation, which sets out Member States’ obligations to collect and transmit statistics on international protection, return and residence permits to Eurostat. The proposal responds to a “real need” to improve statistics in order to provide an adequate evidence base to debate policies on asylum and migration management. However, as per its Explanatory Memorandum, it adopts a minimalist approach to reform by proposing “very precise improvements” to the Migration Statistics Regulation and by targeting data “already generally available in the national authorities’ administrative sources”. The revision of the Migration Statistics Regulation offers a real opportunity for reflection and thorough analysis of statistical gaps in the EU legal framework, however. In line with its consistent recommendations for better data collection on the Common European Asylum System, ECRE urges the European Parliament and the Council to engage in an ambitious and in-depth reform of the Regulation so as to set the necessary foundations for a clear, detailed understanding and evidence-based debate of Member States’ responses to the plight of people seeking protection. ECRE’s recommendations to co-legislators include: a clear distinction between admissibility and merit-related rejections of asylum claims in statistics; more frequent data on the Dublin system; and obligations to collect statistics on additional areas such as accelerated and border procedures, age assessment of unaccompanied children, detention and family reunification with beneficiaries of international protection. The European Commission is also set to publish a report on the implementation of the current Migration Statistics Regulation by August 2018, following the previous implementation report released in July 2015.

http://www.asylumineurope.org/sites/default/files/ecre_comments_migrationstatistics.pdf

Out of sight: migrant women exploited in domestic work

The stories of the domestic workers FRA interviewed for this paper reveal appalling working conditions and fundamental rights abuses in private homes across the EU. These stories indicate that, seven years on from FRA’s first report on domestic workers in 2011, little has changed in terms of the risks and experiences of severe labour exploitation domestic workers in the EU face.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-migrant-women-labour-exploitation-domestic-work_en.pdf

Fundamental Rights Report 2018

The year 2017 brought both progress and setbacks in terms of rights protection. The European Pillar of Social Rights marked an important move towards a more ‘social Europe’. But, as experiences with the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights underscore, agreement on a text is merely a first step. Even in its eighth year as the EU’s binding bill of rights, the Charter’s potential was not fully exploited, highlighting the need to more actively promote its use.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-fundamental-rights-report-2018_en.pdf

 

Fundamental Rights Report 2018 – FRA opinions

The year 2017 brought both progress and setbacks in terms of fundamental rights protection. FRA’s Fundamental Rights Report 2018 reviews major developments in the EU between January and December 2017, and outlines FRA’s opinions thereon.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-fundamental-rights-report-2018-opinions_en.pdf

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-fundamental-rights-report-2018-opinions_es.pdf

 

Periodic data collection on the migration situation in the EU – May 2018 Highlights

In view of the increasing numbers of refugees, asylum seekers and migrants entering the EU, the EU Agency for Fundamental Rights has been collecting relevant data since November 2015. This report focuses on the fundamental rights situation of people arriving in Member States particularly affected by large migration movements. This report addresses fundamental rights concerns between 1 March-30 April 2018.

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-2018-may-periodic-migration-report-highlights_en.pdf

Handbook on European data protection law – 2018 edition

The rapid development of information technology has exacerbated the need for robust personal data protection, the right to which is safeguarded by both European Union (EU) and Council of Europe (CoE) instruments. Safeguarding this important right entails new and significant challenges as technological advances expand the frontiers of areas such as surveillance, communication interception and data storage. This handbook is designed to familiarise legal practitioners not specialised in data protection with this emerging area of the law.

 

http://fra.europa.eu/sites/default/files/fra_uploads/fra-coe-edps-2018-handbook-data-protection_en.pdf

ECRE Policy notes: The Price of Rights

ECRE has published Preliminary Analysis of the European Commission’s Proposal for the EU Multi-Annual Financial Framework 2021-2027 in two Policy Notes focusing on Asylum and EU External Funding and Asylum and EU Internal Funding, including targeted recommendations to EU institutions, Agencies and Member States.

https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Policy-Note-12.pdf

https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/Policy-Note-11.pdf

 

AIDA Briefing: Relocation, a view from destination countries

An AIDA Legal Briefing published yesterday analyses the practice of countries receiving asylum seekers from Italy and Greece through the relocation scheme. The briefing sketches out the treatment of asylum seekers post-relocation in the areas of registration and processing of asylum claims, protection status granted, as well as reception conditions and content of protection provided by destination countries.From the perspective of receiving countries, the experience from the Relocation Decisions shows that processing relocation cases without distinguishing them from the regular asylum caseload and reception system has by far been the preferred and most feasible option, even though several countries such as the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Romania and Slovenia treated these asylum applications by way of priority. Other countries made special arrangements for the reception of relocated asylum seekers, with Portugal setting up a fully-fledged parallel reception scheme.

The bureaucratic and logistical delays of the procedures in Italy and Greece in the early days of the relocation scheme – triggered by factors such as the lack of sufficient and timely pledges, insufficient administrative capacity and prohibitive preferences with respect to the profiles of relocation candidates – contrast with the relatively smooth operation of the relocation process in the countries of destination. The majority of countries which genuinely engaged in relocation eventually managed to avoid excessive bureaucracy and duplication of efforts, while most countries managed to complete the relocation procedure within the prescribed time limits.

From the perspective of receiving countries, the experience from the Relocation Decisions shows that processing relocation cases without distinguishing them from the regular asylum caseload and reception system has by far been the preferred and most feasible option, even though several countries such as the Netherlands, Sweden, Ireland, Romania and Slovenia treated these asylum applications by way of priority. Other countries made special arrangements for the reception of relocated asylum seekers, with Portugal setting up a fully-fledged parallel reception scheme.

http://www.asylumineurope.org/sites/default/files/aida_brief_relocation.pdf