Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka’s Conflict-Affected Women: Dealing with the Legacy of War

Asia Report N°289 .Tamil-speaking women in Sri Lanka’s north and east pushed for accountability and truth during the country’s civil war but have been marginalised during the transitional justice process. The government and international actors must include their voices and address their injustices and difficult economic situation to ensure lasting peace.

https://d2071andvip0wj.cloudfront.net/289-sri-lankas-conflict-affected-women-dealing-with-the-legacy-of-war.pdf

 

Sri Lanka’s Transition to Nowhere

Two years into President Maithripala Sirisena’s term, Sri Lanka’s fragile hopes for lasting peace and cooperation across party and ethnic lines are imperilled. Despite significant achievements in the coalition government’s first nine months, progress on most of its reform agenda has slowed to a crawl or been reversed. As social tensions rise and the coalition slowly fractures, it is unclear whether it can push its signature new constitution through parliament and to a national referendum. Neither the president nor prime minister has made a serious attempt to win support for a more inclusive polity or to reform the national security state to tackle the institutionalised impunity that has fed ethnic unrest and harmed all communities. To protect democratic gains, enable lasting reforms and reduce risks of social and political conflict, the “unity government” should put aside short-term party and individual political calculations and return to a politics of reform and openness.

https://www.crisisgroup.org/file/4778/download?token=8D2KuSI9

“Only Justice Can Heal Our Wounds”: Listening to the Demands of Families of the Disappeared in Sri Lanka

Index number: ASA 37/5853/2017. In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability. The briefing also examines the progress made by the Sri Lankan authorities, as well as highlighting the continuing obstacles to ensuring truth, justice and reparation for crimes committed.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3758532017ENGLISH.PDF

 

Sri Lanka: “Only justice can heal our wounds”: Listening to the demands of families of the disappeared in Sri Lanka

Index number: ASA 37/5853/2017. In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability. The briefing also examines the progress made by the Sri Lankan authorities, as well as highlighting the continuing obstacles to ensuring truth, justice and reparation for crimes committed.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3758532017ENGLISH.PDF

Sri Lanka: refusing to disappear: tens of thousands missing: families demand answers

Index number: ASA 37/5497/2017. Enforced disappearance has touched every community, and within Sri Lanka there has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. With a backlog of between 60,000 and 100,000 alleged enforced disappearances since the late 1980s, there is no shortage of examples of frustrated justice. And yet, family members of the disappeared continue to demand accountability. Their experiences illustrate the impact of these crimes and demonstrate the burden placed on those – particularly women – seeking accountability and the lengths to which some families have gone to get attention to their demands.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3754972017ENGLISH.PDF

 

SRI LANKA: MAKING THE RIGHTS CHOICES

When Sri Lanka co-sponsored UN Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 in October 2015, the authorities finally acknowledged the need to end the long cycle of violence and impunity for violations of human rights. A year later, the government continues to commit to deliver justice, truth, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. However, valid concerns have also been expressed by Sri Lankan civil society groups and victims regarding the pace of progress. This briefing sets out Amnesty International’s recommendations for establishing effective mechanisms to ensure justice, truth and reparation (including guarantees of non-recurrence) for victims.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3749022016ENGLISH.PDF

 

“All Five Fingers Are Not the Same”. Discrimination on Grounds of Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in Sri Lanka

The report finds that people who don’t conform to gender norms face arbitrary detention, mistreatment, and discrimination accessing employment, housing, and health care. The government should protect the rights of transgender people and others who face similar discrimination, Human Rights Watch said.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/srilanka0816web.PDF

 

Sri Lanka: Jumpstarting the Reform Process

Seven years after its civil war ended, Sri Lanka’s democratic space has reopened but strains are building from a powerful opposition, institutional overlaps and a weakened economy. To make reforms a real success, the prime minister and president should cooperate with openness and redouble efforts to tackle legacies of war like impunity, Tamil detainees and military-occupied land.

http://www.crisisgroup.org/~/media/Files/asia/south-asia/sri-lanka/278-sri-lanka-jumpstarting-the-reform-process.pdf

Rebuilding adolescent girls’ lives: mental health and psychosocial support in conflict-affected Gaza, Liberia and Sri Lanka

This study explored the linkages between mental health, psychosocial wellbeing and social norms in the fragile and post-conflict settings of Gaza, Liberia and Sri Lanka with a particular focus on adolescent girls (10-19 years). In particular, the study explored the extent to which services and community and household responses to mental health and psychosocial problems in these settings are sufficiently informed by an understanding of the context, as well as gender inequalities and dynamics, and social norms. This output details the data collection instruments relating to the ReBUILD synthesis report with the same title.
http://www.odi.org/sites/odi.org.uk/files/odi-assets/publications-opinionfiles/10131.pdf