Sri Lanka

Supplement to the International Protocol on the Documentation and Investigation of Sexual Violence in Conflict: Sri Lanka-Specific Guidance for Practitioners

Sexual violence in Sri Lanka, as elsewhere, is a complex and pervasive problem set in a context of deeply entrenched impunity. This has been reflected in horrific fashion through widespread sexual violence against both women and men committed by state actors, including during periods of conflict. Investigations and accountability of those responsible are almost non-existent and survivors often face insurmountable barriers to justice. REDRESS and the Institute for International Criminal Investigations (IICI) have produced a guide to assist practitioners gather evidence of conflict and atrocityrelated sexual violence in Sri Lanka.

https://redress.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/20190315-Sri-Lanka-IP2-Supplement_Online.pdf

Locked Up Without Evidence. Abuses under Sri Lanka’s Prevention of Terrorism Act

This report documents previous and ongoing abuses committed under the PTA, including torture and sexual abuse, forced confessions, and systematic denials of due process. Drawing on interviews with former detainees, family members, and lawyers working on PTA cases, Human Rights Watch found that the PTA is a significant contributing factor toward the persistence of torture in Sri Lanka. The 17 accounts documented in the report represent only a tiny fraction of PTA cases overall, but they underscore the law’s draconian nature and abusive implementation.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/srilanka0118_web_0.pdf

Sri Lanka’s Conflict-Affected Women: Dealing with the Legacy of War

Asia Report N°289 .Tamil-speaking women in Sri Lanka’s north and east pushed for accountability and truth during the country’s civil war but have been marginalised during the transitional justice process. The government and international actors must include their voices and address their injustices and difficult economic situation to ensure lasting peace.

https://d2071andvip0wj.cloudfront.net/289-sri-lankas-conflict-affected-women-dealing-with-the-legacy-of-war.pdf

 

Sri Lanka’s Transition to Nowhere

Two years into President Maithripala Sirisena’s term, Sri Lanka’s fragile hopes for lasting peace and cooperation across party and ethnic lines are imperilled. Despite significant achievements in the coalition government’s first nine months, progress on most of its reform agenda has slowed to a crawl or been reversed. As social tensions rise and the coalition slowly fractures, it is unclear whether it can push its signature new constitution through parliament and to a national referendum. Neither the president nor prime minister has made a serious attempt to win support for a more inclusive polity or to reform the national security state to tackle the institutionalised impunity that has fed ethnic unrest and harmed all communities. To protect democratic gains, enable lasting reforms and reduce risks of social and political conflict, the “unity government” should put aside short-term party and individual political calculations and return to a politics of reform and openness.

https://www.crisisgroup.org/file/4778/download?token=8D2KuSI9

“Only Justice Can Heal Our Wounds”: Listening to the Demands of Families of the Disappeared in Sri Lanka

Index number: ASA 37/5853/2017. In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability. The briefing also examines the progress made by the Sri Lankan authorities, as well as highlighting the continuing obstacles to ensuring truth, justice and reparation for crimes committed.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3758532017ENGLISH.PDF

 

Sri Lanka: “Only justice can heal our wounds”: Listening to the demands of families of the disappeared in Sri Lanka

Index number: ASA 37/5853/2017. In Sri Lanka, Enforced Disappearance has touched every community – spanning time, geography, ethnicity, religion, and class. There has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. Despite daunting obstacles, family members of the disappeared have persisted in their efforts to seek remedies for the harms they have endured. This briefing highlights the experiences of family members of the disappeared who have pressed publicly for accountability. The briefing also examines the progress made by the Sri Lankan authorities, as well as highlighting the continuing obstacles to ensuring truth, justice and reparation for crimes committed.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3758532017ENGLISH.PDF

Sri Lanka: refusing to disappear: tens of thousands missing: families demand answers

Index number: ASA 37/5497/2017. Enforced disappearance has touched every community, and within Sri Lanka there has been virtually no accountability for these grievous crimes. With a backlog of between 60,000 and 100,000 alleged enforced disappearances since the late 1980s, there is no shortage of examples of frustrated justice. And yet, family members of the disappeared continue to demand accountability. Their experiences illustrate the impact of these crimes and demonstrate the burden placed on those – particularly women – seeking accountability and the lengths to which some families have gone to get attention to their demands.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3754972017ENGLISH.PDF

 

SRI LANKA: MAKING THE RIGHTS CHOICES

When Sri Lanka co-sponsored UN Human Rights Council Resolution 30/1 in October 2015, the authorities finally acknowledged the need to end the long cycle of violence and impunity for violations of human rights. A year later, the government continues to commit to deliver justice, truth, reparation and guarantees of non-recurrence. However, valid concerns have also been expressed by Sri Lankan civil society groups and victims regarding the pace of progress. This briefing sets out Amnesty International’s recommendations for establishing effective mechanisms to ensure justice, truth and reparation (including guarantees of non-recurrence) for victims.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA3749022016ENGLISH.PDF