Migration Policy Institute

Weathering Crisis, Forging Ahead: Swedish Asylum and Integration Policy

The Swedish asylum system—long one of the most efficient and generous in the world—faced an unprecedented challenge in the fall of 2015. As the number of refugees and migrants arriving in Sweden surged, processing times for asylum applications grew and emergency housing reached capacity. Schools struggled to enroll young newcomers, who made up nearly half of asylum applicants in 2015. The pace of arrivals, coupled with existing housing, teacher, and interpreter shortages, brought this robust system to a crisis point.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/TCM-Asylum-Sweden-FINAL.pdf

 

In Search of Common Values amid Large-Scale Immigrant Integration Pressures

The rapid arrival of historic numbers of refugees and migrants in 2015–16 reignited discussions in Europe about the rights and obligations of visibly and religiously different members of society. Burqa or burqini bans, for example, have focused attention on the clash between different value systems.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/MPIE-CommonValues-FINAL.pdf

How Are Refugees Faring? Integration at U.S. and State Levels

The United States has long operated the world’s largest refugee resettlement program, admitting nearly 85,000 refugees in fiscal year 2016. Over the years, those admitted have come from a wider range of countries and, as the cost of living rises in urban centers, increasingly been settled in small and medium-sized cities. Most find employment soon after arrival, in line with the resettlement program’s strong work-first philosophy. But as federal funding for many of the transitional assistance programs that help refugees find their footing in the United States fails to keep up with demand, states, local communities, and civil society have come under increased pressure to bridge the gaps.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/TCM-Asylum-USRefugeeIntegration-FINAL.pdf

 

Taking Stock of Refugee Resettlement: Policy Objectives, Practical Tradeoffs, and the Evidence Base

This report examines a number of resettlement programs to pinpoint the core questions and tradeoffs policymakers confront as they introduce new initiatives or scale up existing efforts. It also breaks down the varied (and sometimes conflicting) goals that motivate actors to engage with resettlement and identifies gaps in data collection and analysis that need to be remedied to ensure policies are targeted and effective.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/EU-Frank-FINAL.pdf

A Global Broadband Plan for Refugees

With global displacement at record levels, policymakers and humanitarian organizations increasingly recognize the role communications technology can play in facilitating protection solutions for refugees, both in transit and at destination. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has documented how mobile and Internet connectivity, specifically, enable refugees to remain safe, access health and educational services, build livelihoods, and keep in touch with families and communities.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/GlobalBroadbandPlanForRefugees-FINAL.pdf

 

A Revolving Door No More? A Statistical Profile of Mexican Adults Repatriated from the United States

The revolving door of return migration is slowing significantly for Mexican adults deported or voluntarily returned by the U.S. government, with the number intending to attempt re-entry dropping 80 percent between 2005 and 2015. Drawing from an official survey of Mexican returnees, this report explores the years of residence repatriated Mexican adults spent in the United States, time in detention, and minor children left behind.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/RevolvingDoor-Mexico-FINAL.pdf

 

Advances in U.S.-Mexico Border Enforcement: A Review of the Consequence Delivery System

In its first systematic attempt to track the effectiveness of different removal and enforcement strategies that migrants face after being apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border, the Border Patrol in fiscal 2011 launched the Consequence Delivery System (CDS). This report examines the strengths and limitations of CDS, and finds that as stricter measures have been implemented, attempted re-entries have fallen.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/ConsequenceDelivery-Report-FINAL.PDF

 

The First 100 Days: Summary of Major Immigration Actions Taken by the Trump Administration

During his first 100 days in office, President Trump has taken a sweeping set of actions on immigration, ranging from imposing a travel ban to cutting refugee admissions, “extreme” vetting, and fortifying immigration enforcement at the border and in the U.S. interior. This fact sheet examines the major immigration actions taken to date, legal challenges, and related policy and personnel developments.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/Trump100Days-FINAL.pdf

 

The First 100 Days: Summary of Major Immigration Actions Taken by the Trump Administration

During his first 100 days in office, President Trump and his administration have taken a sweeping set of actions on immigration, ranging from imposing a travel ban to cutting refugee admissions, “extreme” vetting, and fortifying immigration enforcement at the border and in the U.S. interior. This fact sheet examines the major immigration actions taken to date, in particular the executive orders signed on interior enforcement, border enforcement, the original and revised travel bans, and “Buy American and Hire American,” along with related adminstration implementation memoranda. It also assesses the developments that have occurred since the signing of these executive orders, including legal challenges and related policy developments, as well as Cabinet and sub-Cabinet positions related to immigration.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/Trump100Days-FINAL.pdf

The Economic Integration of Refugees in Canada: A Mixed Record?

Since the fall of 2015, refugee resettlement in Canada has risen dramatically as the Trudeau government committed itself to admitting at least 25,000 Syrian refugees—a goal accomplished by the end of February 2016. As Canada expands its resettlement efforts, ensuring the labor-market integration and self-sufficiency of these new arrivals is a major challenge.

http://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/TCM-Asylum_Canada-FINAL.PDF