Human Rights Watch

“Soldiers Assume We Are Rebels”. Escalating Violence and Abuses in South Sudan’s Equatorias

This report documents the spreading violence and serious abuses against civilians in the Greater Equatoria region in the last year. The report focuses on two areas: Kajo Keji county, in the former Central Equatoria state, and Pajok, a town in the former Eastern Equatoria state.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/southsudan0817_web.pdf

 

“I Want to Be Like Nature Made Me”. Medically Unnecessary Surgeries on Intersex Children in the US.

(25/07/2017). This report examines the physical and psychological damage caused by medically unnecessary surgery on intersex people, who are born with chromosomes, gonads, sex organs, or genitalia that differ from those seen as socially typical for boys and girls. The report examines the controversy over the operations inside the medical community, and the pressure on parents to opt for surgery.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/lgbtintersex0717_web.pdf

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/lgbtintersex0717_appendices.pdf

“Like Living in Hell”. Police Abuses Against Child and Adult Migrants in Calais.

(25/07/2017). This report finds that police forces in Calais, particularly the French riot police (Compagnies républicaines de sécurité, CRS), routinely use pepper spray on child and adult migrants while they are sleeping or in other circumstances in which they pose no threat. Police also regularly spray or confiscate sleeping bags, blankets, and clothing, and have sometimes used pepper spray on migrants’ food and water, apparently to press them to leave the area. Such acts violate the prohibition on inhuman and degrading treatment as well as international standards on police conduct, which call for police to use force only when it is unavoidable, and then only with restraint, in proportion to the circumstances, and for a legitimate law enforcement purpose. https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/france0717_web.pdf 

Online and On All Fronts. Russia’s Assault on Freedom of Expression

(18/07/2017). This report documents Russian authorities’ stepped-up measures aimed at bringing the internet under greater state control. Since 2012, Russian authorities have unjustifiably prosecuted dozens of people for criminal offenses on the basis of social media posts, online videos, media articles, and interviews, and shut down or blocked access to hundreds of websites and web pages. Russian authorities have also pushed through parliament a raft of repressive laws regulating internet content and infrastructure. These laws provide the Russian government with a broad range of tools to restrict access to information, carry out unchecked surveillance, and censor information the government designates as “extremist,” out of line with “traditional values,” or otherwise harmful to the public. https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/russiafoe0717_web_2.pdf 

Neglected and Unprotected: The Impact of the Zika Outbreak on Women and Girls in Northeastern Brazil

This report documents gaps in the Brazilian authorities’ response that have a harmful impact on women and girls and leave the general population vulnerable to continued outbreaks of serious mosquito-borne illnesses. The outbreak hit as the country faced its worst economic recession in decades, forcing authorities to make difficult decisions about allocating resources. But even in earlier times of economic growth, government investments in water and sanitation infrastructure were inadequate. Years of neglect contributed to the water and wastewater conditions that allowed the proliferation of the Aedes mosquito and the rapid spread of the virus, Human Rights Watch found.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/wrdzika0717_web_0.pdf

“All Thieves Must Be Killed”: Extrajudicial Executions in Western Rwanda

This report details how military, police and auxiliary security units, sometimes with the assistance of local civilian authorities, apprehended suspected petty offenders and summarily executed them. Two men were killed by civilians after local authorities encouraged residents to kill thieves. In all the cases Human Rights Watch documented, the victims were killed without any effort at due process to establish their guilt or bring them to justice, and none posed any imminent threat to life that could have otherwise justified the use of lethal force against them.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/rwanda0717_web_1.pdf

“I Still See the Talibés Begging”: Government Program to Protect Talibé Children in Senegal Falls Short

This report examines the successes and failings of the first year of the new government program to remove children forced to beg from the streets. The report documents the ongoing abuses faced by many talibé children in Dakar and four other regions during – and despite – the program, including pervasive forced begging, violence and physical abuse, chaining and imprisonment, and sexual abuse. Human Rights Watch and the PPDH also assessed the ongoing challenge of ensuring justice for these abuses.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/senegal0717_web_1.pdf

“We Don’t Have Him”: Secret Detentions and Enforced Disappearances in Bangladesh

This report found that at least 90 people were victims of enforced disappearance in 2016 alone. While most were produced in court after weeks or months of secret detention, Human Rights Watch documented 21 cases of detainees who were later killed, and nine others whose whereabouts remain unknown.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/bangladesh0717_web_0.pdf

Killing Without Consequence: War Crimes, Crimes Against Humanity and the Special Criminal Court in the Central African Republic

This report presents a comprehensive account of war crimes committed in three central provinces since late 2014, including more than 560 civilian deaths and the destruction of more than 4,200 homes. The crimes fall under the jurisdiction of the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the Special Criminal Court (SCC), a new judicial body that, when operational, will investigate and prosecute grave human rights violations and war crimes in the country since 2003.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/car0717_web_0.pdf

“We Can’t Refuse to Pick Cotton”: Forced and Child Labor Linked to World Bank Group Investments in Uzbekistan

This report details how the Uzbek government forced students, teachers, medical workers, other government employees, private-sector employees, and sometimes children to harvest cotton in 2015 and 2016, as well as to weed the fields and plant cotton in the spring of 2016. The government has threatened to fire people, stop welfare payments, and suspend or expel students if they refuse to work in the cotton fields.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/uzbekistan0617_web_3.pdf