Human Rights Watch

“I Won’t Be a Doctor, and One Day You’ll Be Sick”. Girls’ Access to Education in Afghanistan

This report describes how, as security in the country worsens and international donors disengage from Afghanistan, progress made toward getting girls into school has stalled. It is based on 249 interviews in Kabul, Kandahar, Balkh, and Nangarhar provinces, mostly with girls ages 11 to 18 who were not able to complete their education.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/afghanistan1017_web.pdf

In Custody. Police Torture and Abductions in Turkey

This report details credible evidence of 11 cases of serious abuse in detention, involving scores of individuals, all but one within the past seven months. The findings are based on interviews with lawyers and relatives, and a review of court transcripts, including allegations that police severely beat and threatened detainees, stripped them naked, and in some cases threatened them with sexual assault or sexually assaulted them. Human Rights Watch documented five cases of abductions in Ankara and Izmir between March and June 2017 that could amount to enforced disappearances – cases in which the authorities take a person into custody but deny it or refuse to provide information about the person’s whereabouts.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/turkey1017_web.pdf

 

“We Will Force You to Confess”. Torture and Unlawful Military Detention in Rwanda

This report documents unlawful detention in military camps and widespread and systematic torture by the military. Human Rights Watch found that judges and prosecutors ignored complaints from current and former detainees about the unlawful detention and ill-treatment, creating an environment of total impunity. Rwandan authorities and United Nations bodies should investigate immediately.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/rwanda1017_web.pdf

anexo:

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/rwanda1017_annex_web2_1.pdf

 

Central African Republic: Sexual Violence as Weapon of War

Armed groups in the Central African Republic have used rape and sexual slavery as a tactic of war across the country during nearly five years of conflict. Commanders have tolerated widespread sexual violence by their forces and, in some cases, appear to have ordered it or committed it themselves.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/car1017_web.pdf

anexo:

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/car1017_annex_web.pdf

 

“These are the Crimes we are Fleeing”. Justice for Syria in Swedish and German Courts

This report outlines efforts in Sweden and Germany to investigate and prosecute people implicated in war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide in Syria. Drawing on interviews with 50 officials and practitioners working on these cases and 45 Syrian refugees in the two countries, Human Rights Watch documented the difficulties German and Swedish investigators and prosecutors face in taking up these types of cases, and the experience of refugees and asylum seekers with the authorities.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/ijsyria1017_web.pdf

anexo:

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/annex_ijsyria_report_web.pdf

 

“I Have No Idea Why They Sent Us Back”. Jordanian Deportations and Expulsions of Syrian Refugees

This report documents that during the first five months of 2017, Jordanian authorities deported about 400 registered Syrian refugees each month. In addition, approximately 300 registered refugees each month returned to Syria during that time under circumstances that appeared to be voluntary. Another estimated 500 refugees each month returned to Syria under circumstances that are unclear. Jordan has hosted more than 654,500 Syrian refugees since 2001. Human Rights Watch has repeatedly called for other countries to increase their assistance to Jordan and to resettle greater numbers of Syrian refugees living in Jordan.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/jordan1017_web.pdf

 

“They Forced Us Onto Trucks Like Animals”. Cameroon’s Mass Forced Return and Abuse of Nigerian Refugees

This report documents that since early 2015, Cameroonian soldiers have tortured, assaulted, and sexually exploited Nigerian asylum seekers in remote border areas, denied them access to the UN refugee agency, and summarily deported, often violently, tens of thousands to Nigeria. It also documents violence, poor conditions, and unlawful movement restrictions in Cameroon’s only official camp for Nigerian refugees, as well as conditions recent returnees face in Nigeria.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/cameroonrefugees0917_web.pdf https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/cameroonrefugees0917fr_web.pdf

“They Are Not Our Brothers”. Hate Speech by Saudi Officials

This report documents that Saudi Arabia has permitted government-appointed religious scholars and clerics to refer to religious minorities in derogatory terms or demonize them in official documents and religious rulings that influence government decision-making. In recent years, government clerics and others have used the internet and social media to demonize and incite hatred against Shia Muslims and others who do not conform to their views.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/saudi0917_web.pdf

All Feasible Precautions? Civilian Casualties in Anti-ISIS Coalition Airstrikes in Syria

This report documents coalition attacks in March on a school housing displaced families in Mansourah and a market and a bakery in Tabqa, towns west of the city of Raqqa. Human Rights Watch found that ISIS fighters were at these sites, but so were dozens, perhaps hundreds, of civilians. The coalition should conduct thorough, prompt, and impartial investigations of the attacks, do everything feasible to prevent similar attacks, and provide compensation or condolence payments to people who suffered losses due to the coalition’s operations, Human Rights Watch said.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/syria0917_web_0.pdf

“Fuel on the Fire”: Security Force Response to the 2016 Irreecha Cultural Festival

This report details the Ethiopian government’s use of force in response to restive crowds at 2016’s Irreecha. Thefestival, attended by massive crowds, is the most important cultural festival to Ethiopia’s 40 million ethnic Oromos, who gather to celebrate the end of the rains and welcome the harvest. Human Rights Watch found evidence that security force personnel not only triggered the stampede that caused many deaths but subsequently shot and killed some members of the crowd.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/ethiopia0917_web.pdf