Afganistán

“I Won’t Be a Doctor, and One Day You’ll Be Sick”. Girls’ Access to Education in Afghanistan

This report describes how, as security in the country worsens and international donors disengage from Afghanistan, progress made toward getting girls into school has stalled. It is based on 249 interviews in Kabul, Kandahar, Balkh, and Nangarhar provinces, mostly with girls ages 11 to 18 who were not able to complete their education.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/afghanistan1017_web.pdf

Afghanistan: Forced back to danger: Asylum-seekers returned from Europe to Afghanistan

Index number: ASA 11/6866/2017. The conflict gripping Afghanistan is widespread and volatile. Tens of thousands of civilians have been killed or injured, and a wide range of people are at additional risk of other serious human rights violations such as persecution or torture. No part of the country can be considered safe. European countries and the European Union have remained wilfully blind to these dangers, and are putting tremendous pressure on Afghanistan to accept large numbers of returns. Amnesty International is calling for a moratorium on all returns to Afghanistan, until they can take place in safety and dignity.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA1168662017ENGLISH.PDF

 

Afghanistan: The Future of the National Unity Government

Asia Report N°285. The power dispute between President Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah is imperilling Afghanistan’s fragile security and recent economic progress. To avoid the collapse of the U.S.-brokered National Unity Government, both actors must end political partisanship and prioritise the public interest.

https://d2071andvip0wj.cloudfront.net/285-afghanistan-the-future-of-the-national-unity-government%20(1).PDF