Afganistán

Afghanistan – security situation

The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) has published a Country of Origin Information (COI) Report entitled ‘Afghanistan – security situation’. The report is a third update of the version first published in February 2015 and provides a comprehensive overview of the security situation in Afghanistan, information relevant for the protection status determination of Afghan asylum seekers.

https://coi.easo.europa.eu/administration/easo/PLib/EASO_Afghanistan_security_situation_2017.pdf

 

‘Individuals targeted by armed actors in the conflict’ and ‘Individuals targeted under societal and legal norms’

The European Asylum Support Office (EASO) published two Country of Origin Information (COI) Reports entitled ‘Individuals targeted by armed actors in the conflict’ and ‘Individuals targeted under societal and legal norms’. In 2016, Afghanistan ranked second in the top countries of origin in EU+ countries, with more than 175,000 applicants. In the first ten months of 2017, more than 40 000 applications have been lodged in the EU+ by Afghans, ranking third (in the overall applications to date). In addition, the Afghan applications constitute the largest backlog of all countries of origin. At the end of October 2017, there were more than 64,000 asylum applications from Afghan nationals in the EU+ pending at first instance.

https://coi.easo.europa.eu/administration/easo/PLib/afghanistan_targeting_society.pdf

 

ECRE: European return policies – getting the numbers no matter the cost.

Today ECRE published a Policy Note analysing EU return policies and a Case Study on returns to Afghanistan identifying the risks, and the ethical, legal and political implications of a narrow focus on increasing the number of returns in general and in the specific context of Afghanistan.

https://www.ecre.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Policy-Note-09.pdf

 

 

From Forced Migration to Forced Returns in Afghanistan: Policy and Program Implications

With as many as 1 million people forcibly returned to Afghanistan in 2016 alone, where insecurity and instability greet them, the nature of return policies and reintegration assistance from European governments and others merits significant attention. These returns have significant implications for the individuals returned, Afghan society, and the migration-management and development objectives of the countries initiating returns, as this report explores.

https://www.migrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/publications/TCM2017-Afghanistan-FINAL.pdf

“I Won’t Be a Doctor, and One Day You’ll Be Sick”. Girls’ Access to Education in Afghanistan

This report describes how, as security in the country worsens and international donors disengage from Afghanistan, progress made toward getting girls into school has stalled. It is based on 249 interviews in Kabul, Kandahar, Balkh, and Nangarhar provinces, mostly with girls ages 11 to 18 who were not able to complete their education.

https://www.hrw.org/sites/default/files/report_pdf/afghanistan1017_web.pdf

Afghanistan: Forced back to danger: Asylum-seekers returned from Europe to Afghanistan

Index number: ASA 11/6866/2017. The conflict gripping Afghanistan is widespread and volatile. Tens of thousands of civilians have been killed or injured, and a wide range of people are at additional risk of other serious human rights violations such as persecution or torture. No part of the country can be considered safe. European countries and the European Union have remained wilfully blind to these dangers, and are putting tremendous pressure on Afghanistan to accept large numbers of returns. Amnesty International is calling for a moratorium on all returns to Afghanistan, until they can take place in safety and dignity.

https://www.amnesty.org/download/Documents/ASA1168662017ENGLISH.PDF

 

Afghanistan: The Future of the National Unity Government

Asia Report N°285. The power dispute between President Ashraf Ghani and Chief Executive Officer Abdullah Abdullah is imperilling Afghanistan’s fragile security and recent economic progress. To avoid the collapse of the U.S.-brokered National Unity Government, both actors must end political partisanship and prioritise the public interest.

https://d2071andvip0wj.cloudfront.net/285-afghanistan-the-future-of-the-national-unity-government%20(1).PDF